Performing Arts

Doris Duke Performing Artists Initiative FAQ

Questions About the Performing Artists Initiative
What is the Doris Duke Performing Artists Initiative?
Why did the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation (DDCF) develop this special initiative?
What makes these grants different from other grants that support the arts?
How much money is DDCF allocating to the Performing Artists Initiative in total?
Are the two performing artist award categories essentially distinguishing "established" artists from "emerging" artists?

Questions About the Doris Duke Artists
What are the Doris Duke Artists awards?
How can I apply to be a Doris Duke Artist?
What qualifications must an artist meet to be considered for a Doris Duke Artist Award?
Can a Doris Duke Artist also receive support through the Doris Duke Building Demand for the Arts grant?
Who is on the peer review panel, which will choose the Doris Duke Artists?
When will the first Doris Duke Artists be notified of their selection?
How will DDCF measure the success of the Doris Duke Artist grants?

Questions About the Doris Duke Arts Impact Awards
What are the Doris Duke Impact Awards?
How can I apply to be a Doris Duke Impact Award grantee?
What qualifications must an artist meet to be considered for a Doris Duke Impact Award?
Can a Doris Duke Impact Award grantee also receive support through the Building Demand for the Arts program?
Who is on the peer review panel which will choose the Doris Duke Impact Awards?
When will the first Doris Duke Impact Award grantees be notified of their selection?
How will DDCF measure the success of the Doris Duke Impact Awards?

Questions About the Doris Duke Building Demand for the Arts Grants
What are the Building Demand for the Arts grants?
Why has the name of the Program changed?
Why has the structure of the Program changed?
What exactly is the new structure?
Have the priorities of the Program changed?
Most partnerships are residencies designed to support creative time for the artist and/or the creation of new work. Why doesn't this program make that a priority?
How can I apply for a Doris Duke Building Demand for the Arts grant?
What qualifications do artists and organizations need to meet to be considered for a Doris Duke Building Demand for the Arts grant?
How can I determine if my organization is eligible?
Are universities, colleges or community colleges eligible to apply for the program?
Can an organization engage an artist who receives a Doris Duke Performing Artist Award for a Building Demand for the Arts grant?
Can artists for these partnerships come from any field—not just from jazz, theater and/or contemporary dance?
Why can't smaller organizations request the larger grant awards?
Why must there be a prior working relationship between the artist and the organization?
Why don't grants support current company members or existing staff at an organization?
May non-arts organizations, such as community centers, schools, social service agencies or for-profit businesses, etc. apply for support?
Who will administer the Doris Duke Building Demand for the Arts program?
When will the first residency grants be announced?
How will DDCF measure the success of the Doris Duke Artist Building Demand for the Arts grants?
What will happen to the Building Demand for the Arts program at the end of the five-year period?
What do you mean by audience/community/market?
How specific does that plan have to be?

Questions About the Performing Artists Initiative

What is the Doris Duke Performing Artists Initiative?

The Doris Duke Performing Artists Initiative is a special initiative of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation (DDCF) that provides flexible funding to individual artists in the core fields of the performing arts supported by Doris Duke during her lifetime. The initiative represents a landmark investment on the part of DDCF in the potential of individual artists and their future viability, adding $50 million to the Foundation's existing commitment to contemporary dance, jazz, theater and related interdisciplinary work.

Over the course of ten years, the initiative will provide awards to more than 200 artists, as well as a range of dance companies, theaters and presenters. The first two parts of the initiative will consist of two tiers of awards: Doris Duke Artist Awards and Doris Duke Impact Awards. The third part of the Initiative will focus on partnerships between artists and organizations, designed to build demand for the arts.

Why did the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation (DDCF) develop this special initiative?

Doris Duke's will specifically instructs the Foundation to support artists. Guided by this directive and by an understanding of the personal passions Doris Duke pursued throughout her life, DDCF focuses its funding on jazz, theater and contemporary dance as well as organizations that produce and present artists in those fields. The record of artists supported through DDCF commissions and artistic endowments is an extraordinary one, and the Foundation is justifiably proud of the work those artists have achieved with DDCF funds.

At the same time, conversations between DDCF staff and artists revealed a variety of challenges created by those project-oriented grants. Artists spoke repeatedly about the exhausting project treadmill, creating project after project to make ends meet; about the pressures to premiere work supported by these commissions, even when the work was unfinished or unsatisfying; and about the many needs that such project commissions do not support—including research and development time, study, professional development and basic life needs, including health insurance and retirement benefits.

With these conversations in mind, DDCF designed the Doris Duke Performing Artists Initiative to empower, invest in and celebrate artists through grants that offer flexible, multi-year funding, and that respond to financial and funding challenges specific to this community.

What makes these grants different from other grants that support the arts?

The Doris Duke Artist Awards and Doris Duke Impact Awards will provide the largest allocation of grant money ever made available to individuals in the performing arts. The Foundation is aware of no other initiative that provides, or has provided, so many substantial monetary grants to such a significant area of the field, while imposing no project deadlines or related requirements on the artists.

To our knowledge, no other existing grant awards additional funds specifically for audience development and arts education as does the Performing Artists Awards. The unique design of the initiative will empower artists to tailor the grant to their individual needs.

Additionally, the Doris Duke Artist awards are granted based on past achievement (a prior record of funding for multiple projects) as an indicator of ongoing artistic vitality and continued commitment to an artistic field. Unlike various lifetime achievement awards, the focus is on their potential to create great work in the future.

The Doris Duke Impact Awards are also unusual in that the program uses a peer nomination system to help determine who is eligible for the grants and has the potential to elevate grantees to national attention for the first time through this special recognition of their talent.

Furthermore, these grants signal an expansion in DDCF's support for performing artists, from supporting product-oriented projects to investing more deeply in open-ended research and development. They operate outside the model of traditional grants by being multi-year in nature, by their ability to serve artists' needs beyond specific projects, and by their empowerment of artists to determine both the use and the schedule of the funding.

How much money is DDCF allocating to the Performing Artists Initiative in total?

DDCF will allocate $50 million to support this three-part special initiative benefitting performing artists. The two tiers of performing artist awards will support 200 individual artists over a 10-year period. The Building Demand for the Arts program will provide support to at least 50 artists and 50 organizations. This funding is above and beyond DDCF's annual allocation to the arts.

Are the two performing artist award categories essentially distinguishing "established" artists from "emerging" artists?

DDCF has deliberately chosen not to use "established" and "emerging" as descriptors to differentiate the two grantee types, primarily because of the misleading connotations of these terms. "Established" often suggests levels of public recognition and/or financial stability that many, and possibly most, of the grantees will not be able to claim. Similarly, "emerging" tends to suggest relative youth or lack of full artistic maturity. In both grant categories, we expect there to be a mix of generations as well as a wide range of interest in pursuing new creative paths or further mastering their established disciplines.

The distinction between the two grant types is largely based on the level of prior success artists have had in nationally competitive grants programs. This approach reflects DDCF's desire to accomplish a two-part objective: 1) to help artists who have demonstrated their ability to repeatedly win grants free themselves from the constraints of an "artistic grant treadmill," and 2) to recognize and promote other artists whose impact on their fields may be great although they may have received limited recognition through funding.

 

Questions About the Doris Duke Artists

What are the Doris Duke Artists awards?

Doris Duke Artists awards are multi-year grants supporting 100 individual artists in the fields of contemporary dance, jazz, theater and related interdisciplinary work. "Doris Duke Artists" grants will be awarded to individuals selected from a pool of artists who have already received national funding for at least three different projects during the last 10 years, including support from DDCF for at least one project.

Doris Duke Artists will receive $250,000 over a period of three to five years—$225,000 of which will be unrestricted funding and $25,000 of which will be specifically for audience development or arts education. An additional unrestricted $25,000 will be available on an incentive matching basis for artists who can demonstrate that they have started or increased resources (such as IRA's, SEP's 401(K)'s, etc.) that will allow them to continue their creative exploration in their later years when other resources are likely to be unpredictable and more difficult to obtain. This brings the total potential investment in each individual to $275,000. All grantees will have the opportunity to take part in professional development activities, financial and legal counseling and grantee gatherings as additional benefits.

Grantees will be announced annually in classes of approximately 20 artists per class between 2012 and 2016. Twenty-one artists were chosen in 2012, and an additional 20 in 2013. These awards are not open to application.

How can I apply to be a Doris Duke Artist?

These awards are not open to application.

A peer review panel will choose the Doris Duke Artists from a pool of grantees who have received national support (including grants, fellowships, awards and/or prizes) for at least three different projects over the last 10 years, with at least one project having received support from DDCF-funded creation or commissioning programs.

What qualifications must an artist meet to be considered for a Doris Duke Artist award?

To be considered by the peer review panel for a Doris Duke Artist award, artists must have received national support (including grants, fellowships, awards and/or prizes) for at least three different projects over the last 10 years, with at least one project having received support from DDCF creation or commissioning programs. Artists should demonstrate long-term and continued impact on their fields. This award is not open to application.

Can a Doris Duke Artist also receive support through a Doris Duke Building Demand for the Arts grant?

Yes. Because the Doris Duke Artist Awards are largely unrestricted grants addressing life needs and creative time and the residency grants are project specific grants, it is possible for artists to be supported through both kinds of grants. That said, no preference will be given in consideration to recipients of Doris Duke Artist Awards in determining Building Demand for the Arts grant recipients.

Who is on the peer review panel, which will choose the Doris Duke Artists?

Panels are composed of artists and leading arts professionals from the jazz, contemporary dance, theater and/or presenting fields. The identity of specific panelists will not, however, be made public.

When will the first Doris Duke Artists be notified of their selection?

The first grantees were announced in April 2012. Subsequent classes will be announced in the spring each year, although the exact month and schedule may vary slightly from year to year.

How will DDCF measure the success of the Doris Duke Artist grants?

DDCF will measure the success of these grants in three different ways. First, the foundation will track the ability of the grantees to meet their own goals as well as the long-term impact of the grant on their individual careers. At the outset of the initiative, each Doris Duke Artist will be required to engage in a self-assessment of his or her own skills in areas including but not limited to artistic, financial, legal, marketing and audience development, and to set individual goals. The most important measurements will therefore be individual.

Second, DDCF hopes that this initiative will inspire a national dialogue about how individual artists are supported in the United States. More specifically, we hope that through the awards we can demonstrate the value of unrestricted, multi-year funding for artists and the opportunities to move funding from project funding to deeper investment in an artist's voice or career.

Third, we hope that the initiative will encourage other funders to support retirement savings and comparable "life needs" (e.g., health insurance, child care, etc.) for artists as an ongoing priority.

 

Questions About the Doris Duke Arts Impact Awards

What are the Doris Duke Impact Awards?

These awards are multi-year grants supporting 100 individual artists in the fields of contemporary dance, jazz, theater and related interdisciplinary work.

Doris Duke Impact grants will be awarded to artists who have yet to receive national funding for at least three different projects over the last 10 years and/or who have yet to receive support from DDCF. These artists will be chosen based on nominations solicited from peer artists in their respective fields. Impact Award grantees will receive $70,000 over a period of two to three years—$60,000 of which will be unrestricted funding and $10,000 in audience development. An additional $10,000 will be available to artists who can demonstrate that they have started or increased resources (such as IRA's, SEP's 401(K)'s, etc.) that will allow them to continue their creative exploration in their later years when other resources are likely to be unpredictable and difficult to obtain, bringing the potential total investment in each individual to $80,000. All grantees will have the opportunity to take part in professional development activities, financial and legal counseling, and grantee gatherings as additional benefits.

Grantees will be announced in classes of approximately 20 artists per year between 2014 and 2018. These awards are not open to application.

How can I apply to be a Doris Duke Impact Award grantee?

These awards are not open to application.

A peer review panel will select the Doris Duke Impact Awards grantees from a pool of individuals nominated by artists for their potential impact on their fields. These nominees need not have received prior DDCF funding and/or significant national support for multiple projects.

What qualifications must an artist meet to be considered for a Doris Duke Impact Award?

To be considered by the peer review panel for a Doris Duke Arts Impact Award, artists will have been nominated by an anonymous group of peer artists and need not have received prior DDCF funding and/or significant national support for multiple projects. They will be chosen for awards based on their potential impact on their fields. This award is also not open to application.

Can a Doris Duke Impact Award grantee also receive support through a Doris Duke Building Demand for the Arts grant?

Yes. Because the Impact Awards are largely unrestricted grants addressing life needs and creative time and the Building Demand grants are project specific grants, it is possible for artists to be supported through both kinds of grants. That said, no preference will be given in consideration to recipients of those grants in determining the Building Demand for the Arts grant recipients.

Who is on the peer review panel which will choose the Doris Duke Impact Awards?

Panelists are artists and arts professionals chosen from the jazz, contemporary dance, theater and/or presenting fields. The identity of specific panelists will not, however, be made public.

When will the first Doris Duke Impact Award grantees be notified of their selection?

The first Impact Award grantees will be announced in 2014.

How will DDCF measure the success of the Doris Duke Impact Awards?

DDCF will measure the success of these grants in three different ways. First, the foundation will track the ability of the grantees to meet their own goals as well as the long-term impact of the grant on their individual careers. At the outset of the initiative, each grantee will be required to engage in a self assessment of his or her own skills in areas including but not limited to artistic, financial, legal, marketing and audience development, and to set individual goals. The most important measurements will therefore be individual.

Second, DDCF hopes that this initiative will inspire a national dialogue about how individual artists are supported in the United States. More specifically, we hope that through the awards we can demonstrate the value of unrestricted, multi-year funding for artists and the opportunities to move funding from project funding to deeper investment in an artist's voice or career.

Third, we hope that the initiative will encourage other funders to support retirement savings and comparable "life needs" (e.g., health insurance, child care, etc.) for artists as an ongoing priority.

 

Questions About the Doris Duke Building Demand for the Arts Grants

What are the Doris Duke Building for the Arts grants?

Formerly called the Doris Duke Artist Residencies, Building Demand for the Arts grants will support at least 50 partnerships between artists and arts organizations, conducted over a period of 15 months to three years at dance companies, theaters, presenting and/or select service organizations. Partnerships will support efforts by exemplary artists and organizations to reach audiences in new ways. Artists and organizations must have a prior history of working together and will collaboratively conceive the projects.

Why has the name of the Program changed?

In 2013, DDCF launched a first round of grants under the program title "Doris Duke Artists Residencies." While the list of grantees and the projects submitted by many other applicants in 2012 were deeply inspiring, we recognized that the use of the word "residency" may have inadvertently guided and even limited thinking for a significant number of applicants in ways we had not intended. Perhaps because traditional residency programs have been so valuable to artists and organizations for decades, "residency" as an organizing idea automatically carries numerous assumptions (some perhaps unconscious), expectations and limitations. In order to encourage more expansive and imaginative projects, panelists charged with choosing grantees in the first grant round urged DDCF to rethink the very title of the program, leading to the new title emphasizing demand building.

Why has the structure of the Program changed?

While the sheer volume of applications received in 2012 supported our belief that the performing arts sector wants to build community(ies)/market(s)/audience(s) and increase demand, the first round of the program was structured in a way that posed three challenges for applicants:

Especially in a constrained economic environment, few artists and organizations have had the luxury of time and resources to stand back, reflect, probe, imagine and dream together about how they might approach demand building in new and expansive ways. While the program stimulated discussions at a number of organizations, the application schedule was perhaps too compressed to allow these conversations to have the necessary reflective time that could have produced more imaginative projects;
The final application, asking both what applicants hoped to discover and what they hoped to do, may have posed an impossible challenge for many, especially in cases where the conversation and prior relationships between artists and organizations were not extensive. It simply may not have been possible for many applicants to think expansively in the absence of at least a short-term hosted visit designed to explore ideas.
While the program encouraged groups to consider partnerships with artists outside their disciplines (e.g., a film maker at a jazz organization) and to consider the implications of technology, very few proposals in the round one applicant pool were conceived in either cross-discipline or media driven ways.
As a result, the second round of this initiative reflects a new structure, a new schedule and a new emphasis.

What exactly is the new structure?

The former Doris Duke Artist Residency program—now called the Doris Duke Building Demand for the Arts program—has been divided into two separate components. Doris Duke Exploration grants support hosted visits of at least 30 days for artists and organizations to imagine and engage in preliminary planning about new ways to increase demand for jazz, contemporary dance and/or theater. During these 30 days, the artist(s) are expected to gain a fuller sense of the organization, the surrounding community and the target audience.

Doris Duke Implementation grants are designed for partnerships that already have a sense of what they plan to do to increase demand. More specific plans are expected from applicants.

Have the priorities of the Program changed?

The new program retains many of the objectives of the earlier program, even while it has undergone significant changes in its structure, timing and distribution of grants. The program in this second round continues to support artists and organizations, working in creative and new ways, to imagine and pilot new ways of reaching the community(ies)/market(s)/audience(s) and developing demand for the performing arts.

Partnerships that receive both Exploration and Implementation grants will notice that the total amount available to a single partnership and the percentage of the grant dedicated to the artist have not changed since the program was first announced. Maximum investments in any partnership remain $75,000 or $150,000, with at least 50% of those funds dedicated to artist(s) compensation.

With that said, first round panelists were eager to encourage more expansive ways of thinking, especially in realms of technology and in partnerships that crossed traditional discipline boundaries. As a result, a greater emphasis will be placed on projects that fit into at least one of these categories. At least 35 percent of grants awarded will address technology, and at least 35 percent address cross-discipline partnerships.

Most partnerships are residencies designed to support creative time for the artist and/or the creation of new work. Why doesn't this program make that a priority?

DDCF has a long history of supporting the creation of new work in the jazz, theatre and/or contemporary dance fields. That commitment to creation of new work has been affirmed by our Trustees and renewed through at least 2016.

This initiative is part of an additional $50 million allocation to the Arts Program above and beyond our annual program budget of $13.125 million. The bulk of this special allocation will be awarded in grants to artists in the Doris Duke Performing Artist Awards—at least 100 Doris Duke Artists receiving up to $275,000 over three to five years ($225,000 in unrestricted support, $25,000 to help the artist connect to audiences, and an additional $25,000 for supporting the artist's creative journey in the later stages of her/his life) and at least 100 additional Impact Award grantees receiving up to $80,000 over two to three years ($60,000 unrestricted, $10,000 for audience connections and $10,000 supporting the artist's creative journey in the later stages of her/his life). We expect that many of these artists will use their grants at least in part for creative time and to support them as they create new work.

Our field conversations, however, indicate that aggregate audiences for the live performing arts are eroding. This initiative is designed to address that issue of audience demand—i.e., interest, curiosity, hunger, access and/or attendance, as a complement to the grant focusing on creative time. We believe that this might also help artists and organizations work together in a new way: to move past the often adversarial dynamic involved in labor negotiations or scheduling, and beyond the question of "When will you produce/present my work?" to a new question of "How can we work together to increase demand for jazz, theater, contemporary dance and/or related interdisciplinary work?"

How can I apply for a Doris Duke Building Demand for the Arts grant?

Intent to apply forms must be submitted by the organizational applicant by May 31, 2013. DDCF will provide links to the onsite application form to all organizations and artists who submit the Intent to Apply form by the deadline. Applications are due no later than Friday, August 2, 2013. The process will use a peer panel to determine grants and will be administered by DDCF staff. Guidelines are now available on the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation web site.

What qualifications do artists and organizations need to meet to be considered for a Doris Duke Building Demand for the Arts grant?

Exemplary artists and organizations with a prior history of working together can jointly apply for a Doris Duke Building Demand for the Arts grant. Exploration Grants are awarded for hosted visits of at least 30 days to allow the partners to imagine new ways to transform the organization and to develop demand for jazz, theater, contemporary dance and/or related interdisciplinary work. For artist and organization qualifications, please refer to the guidelines posted on the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation web site.

How can I determine if my organization is eligible?

Grants are offered only to publicly supported 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations in the United States. Additionally, applicants must have minimum income of at least $300,000; have an ongoing commitment to presenting and/or producing the work of professional artists in jazz, theater and/or contemporary dance in each of the last three seasons and the current season; or (in the case of service organizations only) have specific programs, activities and/or services benefitting individual professional artists in jazz, theater and/or contemporary dance in each of the last three years and the current year.

With a limited number of grants to award, the panel will be most drawn to organizations with a demonstrated commitment, rather than to aspiration or occasional commitment. If your organization is primarily dedicated to symphonic music with only an occasional foray into jazz, to classical ballet with only an occasional intersection with modern dance, or to the visual arts with a nominal presenting program, your organization is unlikely to be competitive in this initiative.

Are universities, colleges or community colleges eligible to apply for the program?

Presenting organizations affiliated with universities, colleges or community colleges that produce or present professional artists in jazz, theater, contemporary dance and/or related interdisciplinary work are eligible to apply for the Building Demand for the Arts program. Academic departments are not eligible to apply. Additionally the presenting organization must be the applicant of record.

Can an organization engage an artist who receives a Doris Duke Performing Artist Award for an artist residency?

Yes. We do not consider this "double dipping." These Building Demand grants are project grants. The Doris Duke Performing Artist Awards described above, on the other hand, are largely unrestricted support, designed to promote economic dignity and flexible exploration for artists, with no expectations about completed projects. In making their determination, panelists will not consider whether or not the applicant artist is also an Award recipient.

Can artists for these partnerships come from any field—not just from jazz, theatre and/or contemporary dance?

Yes, although the focus of the project must be to increase demand for jazz, theater, contemporary dance and/or related interdisciplinary work. During a meeting with jazz musicians, one attendee said, "I have just realized that, for a generation raised on MTV music videos, jazz must be an inherently visual medium—and I have no idea what to do about that." That observation lies behind the willingness to include artists from outside our core disciplines in these grants. For example, what might a jazz organization learn from a filmmaker about this issue? Moreover, in an age of cultural omnivorism when audiences are less likely to identify in discipline discrete ways, and when the art forms themselves increasingly blur lines and become more inter- or multi-discipline, might there be value in engaging artists from outside of an organization's specific mission focus?

Given the requirement that applicants demonstrate a prior history of working together, we expect the bulk of artists to come from within the disciplines of jazz, theater and/or contemporary dance. But in order to encourage more expansive thinking, at least 35 percent of partnerships will be awarded to cross-discipline partnerships (e.g., a dance artist at a jazz organization, or a film artist at a theater). In all cases, the quality of the project as stated in the review criteria will be the paramount consideration. Highest priority will be given to projects with the potential, not only to impact the specific grantees and surrounding community, but also to resonate with the larger field(s).

Why can't smaller organizations request the larger grant awards?

History in other programs consistently reveals two challenges: 1) Small organizations are often unable to continue large scale programs when the original funding ends. They are more likely to be able to carry out more modest scaled programs. 2) The requirement prioritizing the use of grant funds to compensate the resident artist(s) might mean for some organizations that the artists earn significantly more than long-time or permanent staff—a situation that can provoke tension and destabilize the organization. More modest grants allow smaller organizations to avoid this problem while launching projects they are more likely to be able to continue.

Why must there be a prior working relationship between the artist and the organization?

Past programs consistently reveal that partnerships built on past working relationships can move more quickly, can be created through a deeper exchange of ideas and are less likely to fail.

Knowing that these grants will be offered annually for five years will, we hope, incentivize organizations to explore new relationships with new artists and apply in subsequent years, if appropriate

Why don't grants support current company members or existing staff at an organization?

These grants are designed to promote new, potentially transformative ways of increasing demand for jazz, theater and/or contemporary dance. Such transformation is optimized by the inclusion of outside perspectives—ones that have not become so engrained in ongoing behavior that alternatives are hard to see. Various experts in organizational dynamics have pointed out that familiarity with organizations can make it almost impossible to see new alternatives or ways of behavior, once the individual has become ingrained in ongoing practices. The ideal artist(s) recipient(s) will be an "outside insider"—one with enough prior knowledge of the organization to be able to feel a desire to invest time and energy into a partnership, but not so inside that she/he cannot look at the organization with fresh eyes. That dynamic informed the creation of this program and led to this requirement. That said, the guidelines do allow for former company or staff members—those who have a past relationship with the organization but not within the last four years—to be proposed as the artist for a grant.

May non-arts organizations, such as community centers, schools, social service agencies or for-profit businesses, etc. apply for support?

The lead applicant organization must be a publicly supported 501(c)(3) tax-exempt producing, presenting and/or arts service organization as indicated by the guidelines of the Arts Program and the foundation. With that said, some project may subsequently choose to work with non-arts community organizations as part of an Implementation project.

Who will administer the Doris Duke Building Demand for the Arts grants?

DDCF staff will administer these grants.

When will the first residency grants be announced?

The first grants, determined by a panel in early 2013, will be announced in April 2013 under the program's former name, Doris Duke Artist Residencies.

How will DDCF measure the success of the Doris Duke Building Demand for the Arts grants?

DDCF will evaluate the success of the grants based on the impact of the experience on the artists, the organizations and the communities they serve. We will also look at their ability to explore, adapt and learn from challenges, and finally, to meet the goals they developed together to develop demand for jazz, theater, contemporary dance and/or related interdisciplinary work.

What will happen to the Doris Duke Building Demand for the Arts program at the end of the five-year period?

The program will be evaluated by an independent evaluator. Based on that evaluation and the resources available to the Arts Program at that time, a decision will be made about how and whether to continue the initiative. Since Implementation grants themselves can support projects that take up to three years to accomplish, there is likely to be a hiatus period between awards made in 2018 and a decision to renew/terminate the program, ensuring that a critical mass of projects have been completed and evaluated before that decision is reached.

What do you mean by audience/community/market?

We are employing this awkward triple term in an attempt both to inspire new thinking and to recognize the multiple ways an arts organization might define a group of people with whom it wishes to interact. "Audience" (for many people) instantly conjures up visions of formal performance and a dynamic where the artists perform and audiences watch. Such a dynamic might be at the heart of a viable proposal, but this initiative is equally open to support alternatives that would engage citizens meaningfully outside of this more traditional performance dynamic. Especially in this first round, we are casting the net wide to inspire artists and organizations to dream together about what they might do together to increase public connection and (for lack of a better term) demand.

That said, the artist and organization should have a specific sense of whom they wish to reach/interact with. A sense of intentionality should inform the proposal. Artists and organizations should be able to define clearly the group that they intentionally wish to reach (whether defined by geography or generation or culture or behavior or other specific delineations) and a plan for how to reach them.

How specific does that plan have to be?

Exploration grants are designed to support preliminary conversations and plans to build demand for the arts. The emphasis for these grants is on the potential for the partnership, rather than the "plan" to increase demand.

Implementation grants, however, will be based on a higher degree of planning. More concrete information will be expected from applicants in that program, even while we recognize that a "project" may well evolve over time.